Making sure your deodorant isn’t stink for the environment!

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From left:  My Ethique Rustic deodorant bar (the remaining stub is sitting on the bottom right corner of the box), my current Aotea Road rose and vanilla deodorant and my husbands zesty bergamot and lime scented one. The much loved jar on the right is my empty Dirty Hippy brand deodorant. All of these are great choices and all of them make you “stink pretty” as my Dad would say.

Deodorant! It is an essential item in every bathroom, particularly with outdoorsy men and (so I hear) teenaged boys. Nobody is that keen to trial a new eco-deodorant product and find out the hard way that it doesn’t work. It’s pretty awful when you suddenly realise you can smell your own armpits on the bus! Lucky for you, I have been quietly trialing several different products for the last 3 years. When I began this ethical living journey four years ago, I hadn’t come across any plastic free choices for deodorant at all. The only alternatives I had heard of involved making your own with baking soda. Initially, I was concerned with reducing plastic packaging and during the hunt for plastic free shampoo I found Ethique and their solid deodorant bars. I trialed one and loved it. I was a total convert to solid deodorant and haven’t looked back. Since then I have trialed a number of different types. This blog is a brief review of the brands I have used. All of them work and all of them are plastic packaging and climate-wrecking propellent free. Just in case you didn’t know most spray deodorants use propane, an oil industry by-product to spray out their choking fog!

Ethique: This was my first trial of a solid deodorant of any type. Way back in 2017 I got hold of an Ethique sampler pack that contained a lavender and vanilla deodorant bar. I loved it, and it worked. The tiny heart shaped sampler lasted for ages and kept me smelling fresh all day. I was so surprised at how well it worked that I had to keep checking how fresh my armpits were! Initially the first bar seemed to sweat oil beads in humid weather, but subsequent deodorant bars haven’t had the same problem at all. I trialed the Rustic deodorant bar and loved it too. Another positive is that they last for ages! I still have I tiny stub of each of those bars left that I can stash in my handbag or take travelling when space in a premium. These bars don’t stop you sweating, instead they keep you smelling fresh.

Aotea Road: This is my current deodorant. It is amazing and smells incredible. It comes in a push up cardboard tube which makes it a bit easier to handle and to travel with. I am using the Rose and Vanilla scented one and my husband is using the Zesty Bergamot and Lime one. Both are equally good and no-one has any complaints. Even after the hottest days and lots of physical activity, this deodorant works as well or better than the roll on varieties we used to use. I am a convert and I love that I can just get them at the supermarket.

Dirty Hippy: I love the name and I love the product. This deodorant is different from the stuff we are all familiar with in that you apply it with your fingers from a little glass jar. Don’t let that put you off though, because it is utterly fantastic and it really works. I used this for a long time before starting to trial other brands. I would definitely go back to using it again. You can post the jars back to be refilled if you choose. You can get trial sized testers if you want to try it out before you make your final purchase. I know a number of people who use this and all of them love it.

Bee Fresh: We also trialed this brand a year or two back and had no complaints. The smell was citrus fresh and the result seemed to last well, even on hot days. Definitely worth a try.

Make your own: If you are really keen on the idea you could make your own deodorant. There are many different recipes online to try. One of my friends swears that her homemade deodorant is as good or better than the bought ones. Here is a link to a homemade deodorant recipe I found on line that looks promising. Alternatively you could have a look at this website and try the recipe in the online booklet. I have a very dear friend who recommends this and has been making and using it herself. I haven’t had time to try making my own yet but it is definitely on my to do list for when I get a bit of free time to myself. If you have any great recipes then feel free to share them in the comments.

So there you have it, five different sustainable options for your armpits. No plastic packaging in sight and no needless rubbish to send to landfill. Better for you and definitely not stink for the environment!

Sustainable laundry – options to care for the environment while you wash the clothes!

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Freshly folded clothes straight off the clothesline with that sunny sweet smell. No electricity required, just the free sunshine and wind. My favorite Go Bamboo and Munch brand pegs. In the pink box is my Ethique laundry and stain remover bar.

Washing clothes is an endless task for many Mums and and it is never ever finished. No sooner have you dealt with one lot and there is another lot of dirty clothes building up in the dirty washing bin. The way we wash our clothes is also an area where we have made a few changes in the last year or so since we embarked on the journey to become more sustainable. The laundry is a place where we can all make small changes that will mount up and make a difference to the environment around us and contribute to the future we leave for our kids and grandkids.

Here are some ideas to inspire you to make some small but meaningful changes to your laundry in order to make it more sustainable and environmentally friendly. Most of them have an impact on our water, and so the laundry is an important place to start.

Soap nuts: I was very skeptical about these things, thinking that they were probably not very good. Then I got a bag of soap nuts given to me (for my birthday) and I was immediately fascinated and curious, after all I am slightly plant centric (being an avid gardener) and I am always interested in interesting plants. These things grow on trees and they wash your clothes, two of my boxes ticked straight away. My cousin told me she used them and was hooked. I tried washing our clothes with them and aside from some extremely filthy socks they did just as well as the conventional washing powders for almost every situation. I still use them when I can get them. You can use them multiple times and then you just throw the used shells into your compost! No plastic involved (just a cellophane bag).

Ecostore laundry liquids and powder: I find these products far better than those with artificial fragrance and enzymes. I have used Ecostore laundry products for years because I found them better for my sensitive skin and I prefer the scent of the natural fragrances to the artificial ones in other laundry products. They are safe for septic tanks and that means they are better for our environment. Additionally they are a NZ owned and operated business and they manufacture their products right here in NZ. This is really important for me when I choose products in the supermarket. I try to avoid imports to lessen the carbon footprint. There are now other eco-brands out there but Ecostore was one of the first and is an established quality brand

Ethique laundry bar: This little gem is a great little bar for taking tramping or travelling. It works very well as a spot stain remover and I use it all the time. I have taken it tramping and I would also take it traveling to use for hand washing items where there isn’t access to a washing machine.

Ethique Household concentrates: Spray cleaners often live in the laundry cupboard, and they usually come in plastic bottles. These are new products that I haven’t yet had the opportunity to trial, but a friend of mine has been using them and says they are brilliant. Spray cleaners are something that we all take for granted these days, but spray bottles are something that people usually dispose of and rebuy with the next shop each time they run out. It appears you simply break off a square, dissolve in water and pour into an old reused spray bottle. Spray bottles are a brilliant invention and they can last (if looked after) for many years. Why do we get a new one every time we replace the contents? Even the refills come in a plastic bottle. It seems like a terrible and un-necessary waste of plastic. The idea of a solid concentrate bars sounds brilliant. Until now, our solution had been to buy 4 litre bulk refills and reuse an old spray bottle. We might switch to these concentrates if they turn out to be as good as they sound.

Ecostore whitener: This stuff works just as well or better than the Napisan that is usually used to soak baby and toddler clothes. In fact years ago I switched to Ecostore whitener and never noticed any difference. I felt better about the ingredients in it and was happier to use the product for things that were in contact with the sensitive skin of my precious babies.

Wash cycle options: cold water over hot, eco-cycles to use less water, thus saving electricity to heat water. These options can appear as a bit of an obvious choice but many people overlook the value of something as simple as selecting a different wash cycle option.

Full loads only: In order to maximise the efficiency of your loads of washing, try (where possible) to do full loads of washing. The fewer loads of washing you do the better.

Avoid ironing if you can: Ironing uses electricity, it causes fabrics to deteriorate, and it shortens the life of your clothing. I very rarely use an iron because ironing is not a chore I have much time for in my busy family – although it is strangely satisfying to smooth creases out of clothes. Instead I chose clothing that is unlikely to require ironing. If you are a person who regularly uses an iron, here are a few tips to make ironing less necessary. Hang clothing on clothes hangers while still wet and let gravity and the weight of the water in the clothing pull the wrinkles out. Fold clothing (or sheets etc) straight off the line where you want the creases to be. Then put folded clothes in your drawers underneath other clothing which will help to further press them.

Wear it more than once: If you can reduce the amount you have to wash then you can reduce the number of washes that you do. Simple really!

Air dry your washing: Use a clothes line, or an airing rack on the veranda. This might appear obvious, but really it is an important action you can take to reduce your impact on the environment. The clothes drier uses a lot of electricity which costs you money. The sun and wind outside in the fresh air is absolutely free and uses no electricity. As an added bonus your washing gets that lovely fresh sunny smell. Line dried clothes last longer because there is less wear and tear which is an added bonus. In our house the cloths drier is always a last resort. We have a rotary clothesline, we have put a line up under our veranda and also have a hanging homemade clothes airer in our back porch. In some parts of the world there are restrictions placed on people to prevent them from using outdoor clothes lines. Here in New Zealand, caveats on some new developments are beginning to infringe on the rights of people to have a visible outdoor clothes line. If you are buying into a new development request a copy of the covenants from the real-estate agent. Take time to check that the caveats will not prevent you from line drying your clothes and instead lock you into an energy and carbon intensive requirement to use a clothes drier.

Sustainable clothes pegs: When replacing your plastic clothes pegs try stainless steel, bamboo or wooden pegs. I wrote a blog about this last year and after another year of use my old plastic pegs have almost completely disintegrated (after years of prolonged exposure to sunlight), but my eco pegs are still going strong. I am a convert to bamboo and stainless steel pegs, but if you really want plastic pegs then hunt out a brand of NZ made recycled plastic peg. Stainless steel and bamboo pegs work brilliantly though so don’t be afraid to try something more expensive. They really are worth it.

Choose natural fibres/fabrics: Consider the fabrics your clothes are made from and avoid synthetics that can break down to micro plastic particles and end up in streams and rivers. Microplastic contamination of the oceans is one of the world’s most pressing environmental concerns.  Microplastics are defined as small particles of plastic that are 100nm to 5mm in size.  Fibres from synthetic fabrics can get into the water from our washing machines.  These microplastic particles are small enough to be ingested by many organisms and as a result there are concerns about bioaccumulation. This is not just an environmental problem but also a health problem for us because these microplastics make their way into soils and waterways and from there into the ocean and ultimately into the food chain. In most parts of New Zealand, the councils will allow you to reuse your greywater for irrigation purposes, but it is likely that you will have to install a greywater filtration system. If you reuse your greywater in this way it is all the more reason to consider very carefully what you put down the drain!

Although not directly related to your laundry, do remember to think mindfully about the type of clothing you buy and how much clothing you really need. We are constantly having seasonal fashion pushed at us and the pressure of “fast fashion” is everywhere. This marketing is a dangerous myth. Buy quality natural clothing that is made to last, and then when you wash it you won’t be contributing to the micro-plastic particles in our waterways. Additionally, you will be slowing the consumerist fast fashion machine that hurts the environment and the garment factory workers who manufacture your clothes in substandard conditions.

Choose lifetime guarantees: When buying or replacing a washing machine consider paying for the model with the longest guarantee and reputation for reliability. The longer the machine lasts the better it is for the environment. Planned obsolescence has a huge (and unnecessary) environmental impact. Consider the availability of spare parts for the machine, repairing is better than replacing.

Cane or wicker clothes baskets: Replace plastic clothes baskets that crack or break and contribute to the plastic disposal problem, with wicker ones. In the past this is something we have done, but currently I am guilty of owning three plastic washing baskets. I was given two of them and purchased the other one when we were away camping and a cane washing basket couldn’t be located. I take care of them and I am determined to make them last as long as possible before they reach the end of their lives. It was easier with the cane washing basket when it bit the dust. We composted parts of it and used the rest for kindling.

So there you have it, lots of ideas to help you to make your laundry more sustainable and environmentally friendly. There are so many things you can do, I am sure there are other ideas I have missed. Don’t be afraid to make some changes and try some new products. The impact of our choices mounts up in a way that is largely invisible to us, but every little change we make has a positive impact downstream. I know it can often seem hopeless when we are faced with the magnitude of the problems facing our environment. Despite this we have to start making changes somewhere, and looking after our fresh water is a very powerful, yet meaningful change to make. The laundry is a great place to start!

Plastic free razzle dazzle – DIY eco-glitter

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DIY eco-glitter that you can make at home.  It’s biodegradable, compostable, and easy.  Clockwise from top: dyed cous cous, dyed eggshells prior to crushing, eggshell glitter, beautiful coloured rice.  Center: dyed penne pasta.

Over the time I have been writing this blog, one of the themes that has emerged is a strong desire to reduce the amount of plastic packaging that we use. I want to become more sustainable, taking care of the world I live in leaving a ‘feather light” footprint on the Earth.  That whole concept – to leave a feather light footprint – is so much harder to achieve than it looks in popular glossy magazine articles.  Hard, but I firmly believe that it is achievable – one step at a time.  Today’s step towards a more sustainable future involves mircoplastic.  In particular, craft glitter (but body glitter and make up glitters are equally problematic).

Microplastic contamination of the oceans is one of the world’s most pressing environmental concerns.  Microplastics are defined as small particles of plastic that are 100nm to 5mm in size .    These microplastic particles are small enough to be ingested by many organisms and as a result there are concerns about bioaccumulation in our food chain.  There are two ways microplastics are formed.  Firstly, they can be formed from the breakdown of larger plastic debris in the environment. Secondly, they can be pre-made, such as the microbeads that were in common consumer products such as toothpaste and facial scrubs before they were banned in 2018 in New Zealand.

The term microplastic is commonly associated with the microbeads in cosmetics and toiletries. Of course there is more than one type of microplastic causing problems.  Fibres from synthetic fabrics can get into the water from our washing machines, other types of plastic break down into micro-plastics once they are discarded.  We saw this first hand when our family visited Mana Island earlier this year.  We participated in a beach clean-up where we were astonished at the amount of plastic that you could pick up in one hour, but we were also dismayed to find fragile pieces of plastic that broke into ever smaller fragments at the lightest touch.  This is a problem we are going to have to grapple with here in New Zealand too, because microplastics are being found around our coasts.

This is not just an environmental problem but also a health problem for us because these microplastics make their way into soils and waterways and from there into the ocean and ultimately into the food chain.  Microplastic has now been found in humans for the first time.   I don’t know about you but this causes me a lot of concern.

Did you know that glitter is actually plastic?  Yep that’s right, that wonderful craft item we all take for granted.  A must-have item in any home with kids and found everywhere at Christmas.  Once you know that glitter is plastic it is alarming when you consider how it is used at kindergartens, playcentres, day care, or schools.   Kids (and adults) throw this stuff around at every opportunity.  It gets into hair (and eyes), stuck to skin, all over tables, chairs, and floors where it leaves a sparkly evidence of the activity you have just been doing.  After the glitter is finished with, the tables get wiped down with a wet cloth that is rinsed in the sink and the glitter on the floor gets walked inside and outside (and everywhere in between) until it is vacuumed or mopped up.

It’s a similar story at home.  My kids love art and craft.  All three of them have been art and craft crazy since they were tiny.  We’ve had our share of glitter and I have dealt with a fair number of unexpected glitter bombs!  The most memorable glitter bomb occurred when I came back after a quick trip to the toilet to find my toddler had managed to spread glitter all over himself, the chair, the table, the floor, the window sill, and the kitchen bench behind him where it was adorning the loaf of freshly baked bread that was cooling on the bench.  There were glittery footprints all around the kitchen and lounge. When he moved he appeared to be enveloped in a sparkling cloud, and he looked like a tiny Elton John.  It was interesting trying to clean up after that.

A couple of years ago, I realised that glitter is, in fact, almost always plastic and therefore non-biodegradable.  We haven’t bought any new glitter since.  Having discovered the truth about glitter I was then confronted with what to use as an alternative.  I had to come up with something to provide the razzle, dazzle, glitz and glam to the endless array of craft productions in our house.  To begin with, I steered my kids into environmentally friendly (and cheaper) alternatives.  We picked up acorn shells, autumn leaves, feathers, and even sand.  We used flower petals too.  We had a lot of fun, but it isn’t quite the same as glitter.

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Gorgeous eggshell eco-glitter before and after crushing.  Want finer glitter?  Just smack it harder!

What did people use before glitter?  I pondered this question for a while and then asked my mum who trained to be a kindy teacher in the 1950’s, “what on earth did you do before there was glitter?”   Back then glitter was really expensive and was usually made from powdered glass. She suggested using dyed crushed up eggshells.  Brilliant!  I tried it, the kids loved it, and they could also be involved in the manufacturing process from beginning to end.  We saved eggshells for weeks, and then we washed and dried them.  I boiled water, added food colouring and a teaspoon of white vinegar (to set the colour) and added eggshells.  I left them to sit in the hot dye till they looked nice and bright.  Then we took them out and left them to dry in the sun on a paper towel.  Magic! Bright and vibrant, the kids were instantly attracted to them.  Once they had dried, the kids had a fabulous time crushing them up in their fingers on a tray.  The end result was as fine or as coarse as you want to make it.  The kids used it instead of glitter without any complaints.  To my eyes it actually made for brighter pictures because glitter can appear dark if the light isn’t catching it but the coloured eggshells look bright from every angle.

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Penne for your thoughts…… is this bright enough for you?

Another technique is to dye rice, different shaped pasta, or couscous using a small amount of hand sanitiser and food colouring.  This process is interesting because there are so many pasta shapes out there.  You can even get alphabet pasta and dye that.

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Glitterbugs beware, coloured cou cous is very hard to resist.

I wanted to see how successful dying pasta and rice would actually be, and so I set about dying small amounts of rice and pasta using hand sanitizer and food colouring.  The results were lovely and bright.  I left the coloured rice and pasta on plates to dry overnight.  Next morning I showed my efforts to my 5 and a half year old son and 8 year old daughter as they ate breakfast.  I asked what they thought of it and they were very impressed.  So much so that I later caught my little boy setting up for a full-on craft extravaganza at the table with paper, glue, and glitter alternatives all set out ready for action.  He was super keen to get started, before I had even had a chance to photograph the glitter alternatives for this blog post!  I think that is an indication of how bright and enticing the finished product is.  All three of my kids are really keen on these alternatives to craft glitter.  It has all been a huge success.  The whole process is great, from preparing them to using them, and it is a learning experience as well.

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Fabulous vividly coloured rice is so tempting to creative little artists. So simple to make and fully biodegradable in your household compost heap.

Here in New Zealand we have a word – Kaitiaki.  It means guardians.  That is how we should all see ourselves, as guardians of our land and the creatures we share it with. Today I showed my kids that we don’t need plastic glitter.  It is just one step, but it is a step in the right direction.  Why not give it a try.  Kick the glitter habit and try plastic free craft fun.