Recipes during scarcity – making what you have go further

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A selection of  what I have bottled over the last 10 days.  When I get stressed I like to be doing something, and recently that has translated to preserving.  From left:  Quinces, mixed peaches, “blackboy” peaches, “golden queen” peaches, gherkin pickles, tomato chutney, homemade tomato pasta sauce, and bottled pears.

It has been a quite while since I have been able to post a blog.  Writers block, combined with the general rush and exhausting frenzy of being a Mum with three kids and a part time job, has really affected my writing output.  Since my last post I (like the rest of New Zealand and the world) find myself facing a new and surreal situation.  Here in NZ we are locked down in our homes, united in our isolation as we face the new reality of Covid-19.  This is an unprecedented situation that none of us have faced before.  It is frightening and unknown.  We are unable to leave our homes except for supplies and medical needs, and the world has shrunk to the size of our houses and backyards.  Schools are closed, normal life has ground to a complete halt.  Each day I read the news with increasing apprehension and yet it is hard to look away. I keep reading with disbelief.   We are staying home to save lives, by staying home we all become heroes.  Faced with no libraries, no playgrounds, no socialising, and no cafes, what are we all going to do?

So far our time here has been spent chopping wood, and preparing our winter vegetable garden.  We are well into autumn in NZ, but we still have warm days so things should be able to get a good start before the weather turns properly miserable.

I thought I would share a few ideas to help you find some activities to keep busy and potentially stretch out your supplies.  Particularly regarding making what you have go further.   To that end I am re-sharing my bread and stretched butter ideas from previous blogs.  Simple but effective, I hope you find them as useful as we do.  I am also sharing some ideas for preserving what you might have in your garden or might be able to obtain from a neighbour.

Bottle your own fruit: 

Many people have fruit trees in their gardens (sometimes they are completely forgotten), and many of them will still be covered in fruit.  Our peach tree has just yielded its last fruit and our pear is covered in fruit that is yet to fully ripen.  Usually during the week you (like me) might find yourself too busy to do anything other than gather a few things for the fruit bowl.  But now…. facing four weeks at home, perhaps there is a fruit tree laden with fruit that might otherwise go to waste.  Suddenly there are a lot of people are thinking more about self sufficiency.  One way to be more self sufficient is to bottle and preserve your own fruit.  Or you might find you have a last crop of tomatoes, why not try making chutney or relish?  It is super easy and it looks great, and the chances are you can do it all at home without leaving the house. There are lots of recipes online to give you ideas.    Have a go see what you can make, bake and preserve using what you have.  Perhaps one of your neighbours might have a fruit tree and would be happy to pick a bag for you and leave it at your letterbox.  Sort through your recycling to find your old jam jars and pasta sauce jars if you don’t have preserving jars.

To bottle fruit you need:  jars with “popping” lids that seal (or screwbands and new seals if you have them), fruit, sugar, and water.

I use the basic method for hot pack bottling from the Edmonds Cookery Book.   The Edmonds Cookbook has the proportions of sugar to water for different fruits, and all the tips and tricks you need.   It sounds complicated to a lot of people, but it is really not so hard once you know what you are doing.   If you are uncertain try finding recipes or watching some video’s online.

Freeze what you can’t use now:

Another idea is to freeze any garden produce so you can retain the last of the gardens summer bounty to use later.  Beans and celery freeze well, so do diced carrots.  Even tomatoes can be frozen to cook with later (though not to eat in salads as freezing makes them mushy).  Beans, celery, and rhubarb should be blanched before freezing.  I do that by chopping  them and dropping them into a pot of fast boiling water for one minute before draining and plunging them into cold water.  Chop up pumpkin into 2cm chunks and freeze for later use in soups or for roasting.  If you have blackberries, raspberries or strawberries, you can freeze those to use throughout the year in baking, smoothies, desserts or to make into jam on cold rainy days.

Make your own tomato pasta sauce:

To make your own tomato pasta sauce you will need – tomatoes, onion, basil (dried or fresh), oil, garlic, black pepper, salt, and some jars with lids that seal.

This homemade pasta sauce is simple and easy to make and it tastes absolutely wonderful.  If you have jars and tomatoes you have pretty much everything you need.  Other veges can be added or omitted depending on what you have to hand.  I got my initial recipe from a book called Coromandel flavour – a year of cooking at the bach.  I have found this recipe to be so flexible and easy to adapt that I can add all kinds of things.

You will need: Roughly 1kg of tomatoes (preferably not cherry tomatoes, you really want something a bit bigger if you can get your hands on them).  A couple of tablespoons of oil (olive oil if you have it).   A good sized clove of garlic.  One medium onion.  About 10-12 fresh basil leaves if you have them, otherwise a teaspoon or two of dried basil.  Salt and pepper to taste.

Simply cut your tomatoes in half and remove the core at the stalk end.  In a large pot or frying pan heat a couple of tablespoons of olive oil (or cooking oil if you don’t have olive oil).  If you have onion and/or garlic chop and add it, if not never mind because when you come to open the jar you can always add the onion when you are preparing the actual meal instead of when you are bottling the pasta sauce.  When the onion is translucent, add the tomatoes and half the basil (roughly chopped or dried depending on what you have) to the pot/pan.  Cook uncovered on a low heat, stirring regularly to prevent sticking.  The tomatoes will give out their juices and the skins can be picked out as they roll up and separate from the flesh as they cook. The skins are pretty easy to spot because they are a darker red.  When the sauce has reduced to a thick jam-like consistency add in the last of the basil, and either serve with pasta or bottle the sauce to use at a later date.  I sometimes add chopped capsicum and celery to my sauce to add variety and use up other things in the garden or fridge.  If you don’t have jars with lids, your could freeze it in suitable quantities in plastic containers to be thawed at at later date.

Make your own bread:

Facing 4 weeks in lockdown there is no better time to try your hand at making your own bread.  I shared my bread recipe in a blog post a while back.  Nothing is more wholesome than the smell of fresh hot bread and your family will demolish it before you can blink.  It is truly filling and well worth the effort.  If you have yeast then have a go and you won’t look back.  I know that not everyone has yeast at the moment since people have cleared it from the supermarket shelves during lockdown panic buying, but never fear, there are other ways to make bread.

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Homemade soda bread, so called because it uses baking soda instead of yeast.  I used Jamie Oliver’s recipe to make this loaf.   Spread with “stretched” butter, it tasted amazing.

He is a link to Jamie Oliver and his little boy Buddy making soda bread during the lockdown in the UK.  Soda  bread uses baking soda instead of yeast.  I tried it with the very last of our wholemeal flour and it worked beautifully.  I did a google search and turned up a recipe for soda bread using only white flour, so don’t worry if you haven’t got wholemeal flour.  Get the kids to help kneading and measuring.

Stretched butter: 

Butter is something we are struggling a bit to get hold of during lockdown.  In our family butter is something we go through incredibly fast, so now that it is harder to get, I have begun “stretching” my butter again.  This way we can extend the time between trips to restock.   The way we do this is to “stretch the butter” using an old WW2 rationing trick that I wrote about in an earlier blog. This brilliant trick means you can make your butter last twice as long, and it is soft and spreadable.  All you need is butter, oil, and water.  What could be better?  Follow the link to my earlier post with the recipe and instructions.

If you are homeschooling your kids during lockdown, getting them involved with measuring ingredients is one way to cover off maths work.  Measurement is measurement after all, and it is a lot easier to do maths if you can eat it, than with a pen and paper when there are lots of things to distract you (like the lego box).  Following recipes help kids with reading and sequencing as well as measurement.  Learning in the kitchen is very popular with my kids.

Being alone with my own thoughts doesn’t scare me at all…. in fact, as a mother, I treasure the moments when I get to spend even a few minutes just thinking without interruptions (not that I don’t love the interrupters with all my being).  Never-the-less as I have absorbed the new locked-down world I find myself in, I have found a little ray of hope shining though.  This is what humanity can do.  We can actually unite.  We can all band together to do the same thing at the same time.  Perhaps there is hope for a global response to the climate and environmental emergency’s that are engulfing our planet.

We have to survive the pandemic first, but this is a demonstration of the best that humanity can offer.  Our ability to love and care for someone or something other than ourselves.

Grandma’s tips to save the world!

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Wholesome plastic free goodness!  The cheese dish my grandparents used every day to store their cheese and a preserving jar full of ‘stretched’ butter,  served on the folding tray that Grandpa made.

Our family is on a bit of a journey to try and make more environmentally friendly and socially responsible choices.  One of the big things we are trying to do is to reduce our plastic consumption.  These days plastic is absolutely everywhere. I think we have all got so used to plastic that we are blinded to how much of it there is.  Seventy or eighty years ago things were very different.  My Grandma brought up her family in the 1940’s and 50’s.  Mum remembers when her father brought home their first plastic cups.  He threw them all on the kitchen floor to see what reaction he would get when they bounced instead of shattered.  Plastic was ‘new-fangled’ and Grandma didn’t have much of it, yet she managed just fine without the plastic we have become accustomed to.  So what were her tricks?

Tips from my Grandma’s kitchen!

Use a container.  Grandma had tins and jars.  A container and a lid removes the need for cling film or zip lock bags.  Choose to reuse a yogurt container and lid or ice-cream container rather than put them out straight away with the recycling.  Label with a vivid!  Or use a glass jar with a screw on lid.

Put a plate over the top of a bowl, or use two plates.  Put food on one plate and cover with another, brilliant!  Food stored this way is stackable.

You can use a tea towel or a piece of fabric and a large rubber band.  Fabric used in this way can be washed and reused.  Food covered this way breathes so you don’t end up with damp or slimy food.  Cheese used to go hard when stored this way (but remained usable), nowadays cheese in plastic goes slimy or mouldy.

Cellophane, a rubber band and a jam jar works well too.  In fact at craft fairs you can find homemade jams and chutneys with cellophane lids that are airtight!

Grandma didn’t have plastic straws around the house. Instead, occasionally as a treat they had waxed paper straws.  My mum remembers these from when she was a little girl.  They were seen as a treat.  We now have a supply of paper straws in our kitchen.  A more recent alternative to paper straws is re-usable metal straws. We have a few of these and we love them.

Lunch paper can be used to wrap sandwiches.  Grandma used grease-proof paper to wrap sandwiches. My Mum wrapped my school lunches with lunch paper.  It worked fine then and it’s still fine now.  Used lunch paper can go in the backyard compost heap at the end of its life.

My Grandparents had a large vegetable garden and grew a lot of their own fruit. I don’t know if it fed them completely or if they had to supplement it but it was just how people did things back then.  Vegetables and fruit these days often come pre-packaged with moulded plastic trays and plastic bags, or even shrink wrap.  If you grow your own vegetables and fruit, then they don’t come in plastic packaging. Just pick fresh from the garden. Not everyone has the room for a vegetable garden (we certainly don’t), but you would be surprised how much you can grow in fish bins and pots.

In Grandma’s day they didn’t use plastic bin liners.  In our house we have abandoned bin liners altogether.  Every couple of weeks, we simply wash the bins out with hot soapy water.  If you can’t face life without a bin liner, then choose eco-brands that are compostable.

There were no plastic supermarket bags in grandma’s day.  Baskets, paper bags and reusable bags must have been the norm.  Most people are catching on to reusable carry bags, and increasingly you can get re-usable produce and bulk bin bags.  I have a little collection and very rarely need to use the plastic bags supplied in the supermarket.

Dish brushes and cleaning clothes weren’t made from plastic in Grandma’s kitchen in the 1940’s.  In a previous blog I talked about using alternatives to plastic dish brushes.  This is a surprisingly easy switch to make.

Think mindfully about food.  In my Grandma’s day, she didn’t have a fridge.  Instead she had a food safe to keep food cool and protected from flies.  I suspect that she was more aware of how fast food would perish and used food quickly before it began to spoil.  She made smaller amounts of food so she didn’t have to worry about storing the left overs.  This is a great way to reduce food waste.

Try ‘stretching’ butter.  My Grandma brought up her family during WW2 and wartime rationing.  She never bought spreadable butter in a plastic container.  I have now stopped buying margarine or spreadable butter products because they come in plastic.  A wonderful friend of mine gave me a WW2 era recipe for ‘stretching’ butter while rationing was still in place.  So simple and effective, I wish I had known about this earlier.  Here is the recipe to make 500g of butter into 1kg of stretched butter.

You need: 500g of butter at room temperature, 1 cup cooking oil (whatever type you prefer), and one cup water.

Simple whiz up the butter in a food processor (or with a hand held mixer), till whitish and pale, then add the oil and water half a cup at a time and mix until blended.  Scrape it into a container with a lid and pop it in the fridge.  If you want to stretch the butter further you can add 1.5 cups of water and 1.5 cups of oil.  I prefer the mixture to be slightly firmer and not to melt quickly so I use less oil and water.  I was told that this ‘stretched’ butter is fine for baking but I haven’t actually tried it.  However it does taste great on freshly baked bread, and you never need to deal with a greasy plastic container again!

There are other things you can do too.

You can try to avoid convenience foods.  This is hard to do and believe me I still struggle with this one.  But more and more I am considering my purchases and choosing to avoid buying things that come in disposable plastic packaging.  Or better still try making your own convenience foods; muffins, crackers, bread or biscuits taste better if they are home made.

Tinfoil can be used in almost exactly the same way as cling film AND it can be recycled!  One person I have spoken too prefers cling film because she can see what’s in a container.  An easy way around that issue is to have a permanent marker and simply write on the tinfoil. While it is energy intensive to manufacture it is reusable (if you take care of it) and recyclable.  Used tinfoil isn’t clogging up our oceans.

Beeswax wraps might not have been around in the 1940’s but they are an option these days.  They’ve become increasingly popular in the last few years. Check out my blog on these nifty alternatives to cling film.

My Grandma and Grandpa didn’t buy anything they didn’t need, and they didn’t throw out anything they could use.  They grew up in the depression and lived through WW2, times were tough.  They saved string to reuse, they saved wrapping paper to reuse, and Grandpa apparently straightened old nails to reuse.  I think my grandparents would be stunned to see how people take plastic for granted.  Thinking about Grandma’s kitchen I can’t work out why we even need it.  If she could manage to bring up a family without plastic during a war, I am certain I can do it today. Challenge yourself to make a few small changes and you will be surprised how easy it is.

Get SUST with beeswax wraps! Ditch cling film and change the world!

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Cling film annihilation kit ready for action.

Cling film has been a staple feature of just about every kitchen for years.  It’s so quick, so convenient, so useful, so effective.  What would we do without it?  A hundred years ago in my great grandma’s kitchen they had never heard of it and it would be years before it arrived to make life in the kitchen easier.   My great grandma managed just fine without it so why can’t I?  Challenged by this fact I finally abandoned cling film (Glad Wrap) in my kitchen about a year ago.  There are so many alternatives, that replacing it was surprisingly easy.  Most recently I tried and liked some beeswax wraps, so I decided to try making my own.  So here is one way to replace cling film and all you need to know to make your own beeswax wraps.

I researched the history of cling film and was startled to discover it was invented back in the 1930’s. But I don’t think it arrived in household kitchens till the 1950’s.   Sadly our concern about it is a much more recent thing.  As a result the environment and the animals we share this planet with are drowning in an accumulation of forgotten plastic, including cling film.

Cling film is one of those things you use, throw away and never think about again.  What happens when it’s finished with?  It is often seen blowing around school playgrounds.  I’ve fished it out of the Hutt River and I picked up shreds of it on a beach in the Coromandel this year.  Last time I visited the rubbish dump I saw it caught in the bushes lining the road to the dump.  I’ve read about how it has been found in the stomach contents of dead albatross chicks and how sea turtles think it is jelly fish.   Adult sea birds often mistake floating plastic for fish and they feed it to their chicks not realising that it isn’t fish.  A tummy full of fish helps a chick to grow, but a tummy full of plastic is a death warrant.  We are hearing much more these days about the problems associated with single use plastic and how devastating it is for our oceans.  I read with increasing alarm and shame that we are heading for a future where there will be will be more plastic in the ocean than fish.

There are many ways to replace single use plastics in your kitchen. I’ll be looking at this more in my next blog post.

Make your own beeswax wraps!                      

Beeswax wraps.  These have become increasingly popular in the last few years, but according to good old google, people have been waxing fabric since ancient times.  The benefit of beeswax wraps are that they are made from simple “good” ingredients.  These nifty wraps mimic most of the properties of cling film and are compostable.  Even better, an old beeswax wrap can be cut into strips and made into fire starters (you can even buy wrap off-cuts for this purpose).

Because I was trying to find alternatives to single use plastic, I was very curious to give them a whirl.  Last October I decided to get a couple of small Munch beeswax wraps and see what I thought of them.  I was pleasantly surprised.  They smell wonderful, and they really do seem to work well.  Unfortunately they are expensive (at least initially) and I wasn’t able to afford any larger ones.  I had some difficulty getting them to stay properly on the cut end of a cucumber, but a rubber band sorted that out.  They stay on most bowls alright.  Sometimes they need to be pressed on again with warm hands after a day or so.  I’ve had no problems washing them, and they make a packed lunch a visual treat!

I really wanted to get a couple of larger ones since we often need to cover larger containers but the expense put me off.  Then I discovered Pure Nature.

This amazing company sells everything you need (except the fabric) to make your own.  This is where I purchased the beeswax, pine rosin, and jojoba oil to make mine.  It’s pretty good value since I will get another 4 batches of wraps out of the bag of pine rosin, and another two batches of wraps out of the bottle of jojoba oil. The 100gms of beeswax was used up on one batch of wraps.  Making my own was a cheaper option for me than buying ready-made wraps.  I ended up with 5 large (30x30cm), 2 medium (20x20cm), and 2 small (15x15cm) sized wraps.  I love being creative so making my own was great fun, and really simple.

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Cutting the fabric to size.

Here’s how to make your own.

You’ll need to get some cotton fabric or dig into your fabric stash if you have one.  Natural fabrics (cotton or hemp) are best (but not wool).  I pre-washed my fabric and then cut to size with pinking shears.

You’ll need an old pot and an old bowl (to use as a double boiler), tin foil, a paint brush (a thicker one so you can brush the mixture on quickly), and a set of scales.

Ingredients: 20g pine rosin, 3 tablespoons jojoba oil, and 100g beeswax.  Jojoba oil is used for its anti-microbial properties.  Pine rosin is used to achieve a slightly tacky texture and helps the wrap to more closely mimic the properties of cling film.

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Wrap making in action.  Brushing the mixture on with a brush.
  1. Cut fabric to size.
  2. Preheat the oven to 160 degrees Celsius.
  3. Use a mortar and pestle to crush the pine rosin.
  4. Put beeswax, crushed rosin and jojoba oil in the bowl.
  5. Melt together over double boiler. Stir to mix.
  6. Put a sheet of tin foil on a baking tray and lay a fabric square on it.
  7. Brush beeswax onto the fabric quickly, making sure to cover evenly and try to avoid pools. It will start to set very quickly.
  8. Place tray in oven for 3 minutes to allow the fabric to absorb the beeswax.
  9. Remove and check that there are no bare spots and that the wax is evenly distributed.
  10. Hang to dry.
  11. Start using.
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The finished product!  Nine new beeswax wraps.

Wash with cool soapy water and hang to dry.  Avoid heat, and don’t use to wrap raw meats or fish.

Simple and fun.

The question I keep asking myself regarding single use plastic like cling film is whether I really need it. Is a moment of perceived convenience worth the cost to our environment and the animals that share it with us?  We throw it away when we finish with it, but where is away?  As David Attenborough says “There is no ‘away’ because plastic is so permanent and indestructible.  When you cast it in the ocean…it does not go away”.  It doesn’t go ‘away’ when it ends up in the landfill either.  I feel the weight of that plastic like a burden.  But each time I use one beeswax wrap I know I am making a small but significant difference, and it is worth it for my children’s future.

The eco-mundane, plastic free dishwashing!

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Sustainable alternatives to plastic in your kitchen.  From Left: Dishy bottle brush, Wet-it! kitchen cloth, Eco Max dish brush, and Ecostore dish brush.

A year ago I began the task of “de-plasticking” my kitchen.  This is something I’d wanted to do for a long time but hadn’t known where to begin because there is so much plastic in my kitchen.  In the end I started by getting an Ecostore dish brush to replace the bright plastic one that had finally worn out.

Look around the average kitchen and you will be amazed how much plastic you can find. Most measuring cups are plastic, most kitchen cleaning cloths and sponges are synthetic.  There is plastic cling film, there will be a plastic dish brush and more than likely a plastic pot scourer.  Bottle brushes are plastic, there are plastic storage containers, (Tupperware Sistema and more). Many pantry items are wrapped in plastic or come in plastic bottles or containers.  Even cucumbers are wrapped in plastic these days!  There are often nylon cooking tools, maybe even plastic mixing bowls.  And this is only the beginning.  There are so many other plastic items you can add to that list!  What’s important to keep in mind is that any little pieces of these things make their way down the drain and into our oceans.

Now that I look around my kitchen with my eyes opened to the global plastic problem I am horrified and guilt struck that I opted to buy these things in the first place.  I did choose quality plastic products most of the time, which are lasting and haven’t had to be thrown away.  The most environmentally friendly thing I can do is to use them carefully and stretch out their lives to the maximum before putting them out to recycle if I can.  I have opted to not replace any plastic utensil or tool in my kitchen unless it has reached the very end of its life. Thus the first thing I replaced was my red plastic dish brush. I moved it into the laundry to become an all-purpose scrubber for showers, buckets, and garden tools.  In another year or two it will end up in the landfill because it isn’t deemed recyclable.

I chose to replace it with an Ecostore dish brush with a handle and replaceable brush head.  I first ran into these when I worked at the Ministry for the Environment where all the staff kitchens had one.  I was skeptical of how well they would work, but was pleasantly surprised.  Now all these years later, I decided to get one and I was ridiculously pleased with it.  At my husband’s suggestion I oiled it with cooking oil to prevent cracking and started using it.  Interestingly we all found it to be more effective on most cooking remnants that the plastic equivalent.  The softer bristles are more densely packed and do a much better job.  Where it falls down is when something is burned on (of course that hardly ever happens in my kitchen!) or dried on.  The softer bristles don’t do so well then.  I have a much tougher natural bristle potato scrubbing brush that seems to do well for that.  All in all it works fine and lasts OK.

The one problem I’ve had with it is that the handle and the head keep coming apart now after a year of use.  It seems that the ferrule is not strong enough to prevent the brush head rotating or falling out.

I have found this very frustrating.  I am not sure if it is a design flaw or if it is peculiar to this one dish brush.  I have new Ecostore dish brush and handle now, so I’ll be able to see how it performs compared to its predecessor.  I also have an Eco Max dish brush purchased at Commonsense Organics.  This one is made of coconut fibre and seems to be practical.  It doesn’t look to me like it will be prone to coming apart.

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The not so useful Eco Max bottle brushes (left), my old faithful but slightly irritating Ecostore  dish brush with the rotating head (center), an old Ecostore dish head (nearly ready for composting) and my amazing Potato brush!

I have also tried to replace my ancient plastic bottle brush.  This has been more challenging so far.  We bought an Eco Max bottle brush that is made of wire and coconut fibre, but it is much too large to go into most of our bottles.  The more flexible handle is both useful and problematic.  Being able to bend the handle has its uses for odd shaped bottles and hard to reach corners.  But, apply any pressure and the handle bends and any stubborn muck remains hard to remove.  We bought a smaller one in the same brand but it is still too big for most bottles and is considerably shorter so doesn’t reach the bottom of taller bottles and vases.  I really wanted this to work out, but really I don’t think having 3 different sized bottle brushes to cater for all possible bottles makes much sense.  The only thing I would say that they are an OK-ish substitute for dish brushes when the regular one has gone walkabout.  I wouldn’t recommend this brand for bottle brushes unfortunately.

Luckily I recently found a Dishy bottle brush.  Unlike the Eco Max bottle brushes this one isn’t vegan, but it is all natural, biodegradable and contains no plastic. This has been a success as it fits in all bottles in the same way my manky old plastic one did. I love it.

So if you are looking for an alternative to your supermarket bought plastic dish brush, or bottle brush, rejoice!  There are alternatives out there and you can find ones that work perfectly well.  Next time you need to replace your unsustainable plastic dish brush, try a sustainable biodegradable alternative.  They are not hard to find.  I have seen them at Commonsence Organics, Palmers Garden Centre, Moore Wilsons, and online.  They are a great way to start reducing plastic in your kitchen.

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Compostable alternatives to synthetic kitchen cloths.  Top: Wet-it brand (in cute caravan print).  Bottom: The Green Collective brand cloths after two months in my kitchen.  They don’t look too shabby do they?

I have also been slowly replacing my synthetic yellow fluffy supermarket bought kitchen cloths.  I liked them because they hold a lot of fluid and are easy to rinse.  But I don’t like the fact that they are synthetic.  That bothered me a lot.  A few months back we found The Green Collective sustainable kitchen cloths.  They retail for about $8.99 online and I think that is what we paid for them at Moore Wilsons.  They come in lots of snazzy designs and colours.  They are made from 100% natural and renewable materials – cellulose blended with cotton. They are super absorbent and can be composted at the end of their lives.  Mine are lasting much better than I expected.  No real sign of wear and tear even after 2 months.  They are machine washable and I have had no trouble reviving them with Ecostore stain remover in an overnight soak.  I am very happy with them.  Another brand we found a week or two back is Wet-it! which we spotted in Commonsense Organics for $5.

A good friend of mine has another approach.  She cuts up old cotton tee-shirts and uses them as kitchen cloths and cleaning rags.  This is what I grew up with as my Mum used old tee-shirts for kitchen cloths and general purpose cleaning rags.  There is nothing wrong with this approach either, and it certainly is moneysaving.  Old tee-shirts repurposed into cleaning cloths can be composted when they are more hole than rag provided they are cotton (or other biodegradable fibre).  In my laundry I have several of these old tee-shirt cloths for household cleaning jobs.

So there you have it.  A few easy ideas to start reducing the plastic in your kitchen this New Year!  There is never going to be a better time to make a resolution to reduce your household plastic consumption.  Why not commit to reducing plastic in your house in 2018?  It is not hard and it doesn’t have to be expensive.  We owe it to the environment to give it a go and we owe it to our children to change our habits now that we know how big the plastic problem is!