DIY alteratives to non-biodegradable wet wipes.

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Homemade wet wipes, all ready to go.  Inexpensive, simple, and easy to make at home.  

 

Wet wipes are widely considered to be essential for any new parent to carry everywhere but most are non-biodegradable, contain plastic fibers, come in plastic packaging, and  can contain various things that can upset a sensitive skin.  Marketed as quick, easy and convenient, wet wipes are a multi million dollar industry that is anything but convenient for our environment.   Did you know that you can make your own?  Quick and super easy to do, here is all you need to know have a go at making your own.  They are inexpensive and you can be certain of what you are putting in.  This latter point is essential if you or your children are like me and suffer from contact allergies and atopic eczema.

Most wet wipes are unable to be flushed down a toilet, and must be disposed of in the rubbish.  I’ve seen them blowing around at the dump, and I have seen them spilling out of rubbish bins in public toilets.  Many people flush them anyway, and then they contribute to the formation of “fatbergs” which block drains and cause headaches for local authorities. While technically “disposable”, in reality discarded wet wipes don’t just magically disappear when they are disposed of.  They persist in sewers, drains and rubbish dumps for far far longer than any of us really want to think about.  Wet wipes are an increasingly serious environmental concern, both here in New Zealand and around the world.  Watercare in Auckland is now spending $1 million a year on removing fatbergs and blockages from the network.  In an article in 2015, The Guardian labelled them the biggest villain of the year.  They are ending up in rivers and waterways and they are making their way into the ocean where they contribute to the growing plastic catastrophe affecting ocean wildlife.  A walk on a beach is increasingly a first hand opportunity to see the effects of our plastic addiction.  For most people, wet wipes are an invisible contributor because once disposed of they are out of sight, out of mind.

A few years ago, as a Mum with two small children, I made my own baby wipes.  At the time finances were tight.  With my daughter I used organic wet wipes for traveling (when I could occasionally afford to get them) or baby sized re-usable cotton washcloths around the home.  When I had my son 2.5 years later, I was given a recipe to make your own wet wipes.  Initially dubious, I gave it a go and was instantly converted.  I used them everywhere and took them everywhere by packing a smaller quantity into a smaller container for the nappy bag.  I never had any problem with them, and it must have saved me a LOT of money over the years I used them. A huge bonus for me was that I could choose what I added to them.  Some brands of wet wipes cause me huge problems with my skin condition.  Making my own completely eliminated this problem.

A few generations ago, wet wipes didn’t exist.  My Grandma didn’t use them for her children or struggle to keep them clean without them.  She managed fine, just like everyone bringing up kids in the 1930’s and 1940’s.  I find a lot of inspiration from thinking about how my grandparents managed without plastic.   So many plastic things are sold to us as essential and necessary, but if they weren’t necessary and indispensable  70 years ago, are they really needed today?

Wet wipes come in plastic packaging which is currently not really possible to recycle, they are made from non-biodegradable materials, they are bad for our environment.  The good news is that despite what the wet wipe companies would like us to think, we can do without them.  You can actually make your own.

Here’s how to make DIY wet wipes.

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First, you will need to get a roll of paper towels.  They will need to be the super heavy duty variety, or they won’t work as well.

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Second, using your chopping board and a sharp knife, cut your roll of paper towels in half.  It doesn’t have to be exact, just use your eye-o-meter.

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Third, in a jug mix 350mls of warm water, a couple of squirts of your body wash or baby wash, and a few drops of oil (I use sweet almond oil).  If you want to you can also add a  few drops of New Zealand Manuka oil.  Manuka oil would be a great option given it’s clinically proven antimicrobial and antiviral properties – a good idea for anything to do with personal hygiene

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Forth, you will need a container with a leak proof lid that is big enough to fit your half roll of paper towels.  Put your half roll into the container.  Yes I have used a plastic container, but I already had it in my cupboard and it is reusable over a long period of time.

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Fifth, pour the water into the middle of the paper towel roll.  Put the lid on and leave for a couple of minutes.  Then tip it upside down and leave for another couple of minutes.

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Sixth, open the container and remove the paper towel roll, find the end and away you go.  Home made wet wipes ready to use.

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If you find that the paper towels are a little bit dry (it depends on what brand you use how much they absorb) just add small amounts of warm water until they are the desired dampness.

Cheap, easy, and effective, and fully biodegradable, they are perfect to replace the expensive shop bought ones.  They work for tiny bottoms, and they are perfect for camping, where handwashing and face washing are a little walk from the campsite.  The only caveat is that in warmer weather they can develop mold if not used fairly quickly.  Please note that in spite of being fully biodegradable they are a thicker grade of paper and still shouldn’t be flushed down the toilet because they can cause problems.  Depending on what they are used for you can just compost them – for example if you are just wiping sticky fingers and messy mouths.

Another tip to replace shop bought wet wipes is to simply get a decent supply of small washcloths or facecloths and use those instead.  This latter idea is particularly effective at home.  I have a large box of baby sized soft cotton washcloths left over from when the kids were babies.  I boil them with a small amount of ecostore soaker every now and again to freshen them up.  I don’t know why people have forgotten about good old fashioned fabric cloths.  They are such a wonderful solution to every kind of sticky kiddie mess and they are fully reusable.  Simply run under the tap, squeeze out and clean up the messy hands, then drop in the washing machine.

Reusable washcloths and homemade wet wipes are another simple way to make a difference.  One more step towards leaving a feather light impact on the environment for future generations.  Why not give it a go and see how easy it is for yourself?

SUST Product Review #1: Ethique

Here I am doing my first SUST product review.  Exciting times!  I don’t know how many of you are aware that there are some companies out there making solid shampoo bars, bodywash alternatives and even deodorant.  Ethique just happens to be the first I have been able to sample myself.

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The packaging is 100% biodegradable.  I didn’t think of taking a photo before I started using these products, but this gives you some idea what I am talking about.

Have a look at Ethique’s website and see what you think.  Ethique state that they are plastic free and their packaging is fully compostable.  They are cruelty free (not tested on animals), sustainable, and locally made in Christchurch NZ.  They are B corp. certified and a Climate Friendly Business.

I love that the packaging included no plastic at all.  It was so refreshing not to have to put a whole lot of plastic out for recycling or to landfill.  Not even the postal packaging was plastic.  It also came complete with a neat little card stating that I had saved the equivalent of two plastic bottles!

The body sampler pack was particularly neat and nifty.  One of these (or one of their other sampler packs) would make an excellent birthday or Christmas present.

Here is a rundown of the products I have sampled.

The Lime and Ginger bodywash bar is wonderful to use.  It smells fresh and leaves me feeling clean.  It is lasting really well and it’s not just me using it, the kids like it too.  In contrast, the Lime and ginger body polish is lovely to use, however it is clearly not going to last anything like as long as they claim.  After only two uses the sample block is shrinking away.  The other bodywash samples are lasting much longer.

The Glow Lavender and Vanilla deodorant is INCREDIBLE.  I have never used a product this effective. After a morning application I had no BO problems at all.  I know because I kept incredulously sniffing my armpits every hour or so expecting to have to reapply.   At bed time I could still clearly smell the deodorant much the same as when first applied.  I couldn’t detect any BO at all.  I‘ve been using it for weeks now with no problems.  I certainly won’t bother with the products in regular supermarkets ever again!

The In Your Face cleanser is another winner!  It is lasting well, it smells divine (think raspberry sherbet) and leaves my face feeling incredible.

My husband is trialing the suave shampoo and shaving block.  So far he says it is very good, equivalent to mainstream shaving products he has used, but is bit expensive.  It works nicely as a shampoo, and works well for shaving.  It seems to double as bodywash perfectly adequately (which is a bonus when traveling).  Recently overseas for work, he only needed to take one solid bar instead of three plastic bottles!

I was sceptical of the solid shampoo idea, but it really is effective.  I like a good lather that leaves my hair squeaky clean.  I also have a sensitive scalp that is prone to irritation.  I am pretty attached to my favourite shampoo, so the Damage Control shampoo bar had a lot to live up too.  I was very excited to try it.  I rubbed it on my head as per the instructions, massaged it in a bit and hey presto!  Bubbles and lather everywhere.  The smell reminded me of oddfellow mints.  The only thing I noticed is that the bar gets slippery very quickly so I have dropped it a couple of times leading to some very flat corners.  I’m now careful to put it up high on the shower caddy away from splashes and shift it to the window sill where it can dry out between washes.

Coconut and lime butter block is the only thing I haven’t sampled personally.  I can’t stand the smell of coconut on me.  A strange personal foible I know, but I don’t like coconut to eat or to wear!  I was dubious that everything would smell like coconut, but in fact the butter block is the only one I didn’t like.  Everything else smells fantastic.  I got my 14 year old daughter to try it out instead and she loves it!

I have atopic syndrome which leads to skin rashes for much of the year.  At its worst I am totally miserable.  I have a lot of trouble finding beauty products that don’t make it worse or set it off.  So far the Ethique products I have trialed have been OK. After years of bland smelling hypo-allergenic products it is unbelievably nice to use such lovely smelling things.  Every shower is bliss!

Using solid bars rather than liquid products seems to require a bit of a shift in how you do things.  For example, the bars don’t like staying wet.  The deodorant got a bit damp and moist when left in out in the steamy bathroom so I keep it in the bedroom instead.  The shampoo needs to dry out between uses, so I put it on the bathroom window sill.  All in all, the only things that need a big change are our buying habits and a few minor alterations to where you keep your products.

Why is this brand so exciting?  For me it is because these products tick so many boxes for us on our ethical and sustainable journey.

Some of Ethique’s products are expensive, but with the exception of the body polish bar (as mentioned) they all seem to be lasting well.  I am not yet certain if they will live up to the promise to outlast a liquid equivalent.  I don’t have reliable usage data to compare to.  However, so far the deodorant, and bodywash are performing very well and I wouldn’t be at all surprised if they do outlast my usual products.  At $9.50 for the lime and ginger bodywash, I think this is great value because it is considerably cheaper than the $14 I have been paying for my usual brand.

The shampoo, seems to be going well for me too.  The shampoo bar cost $22 which is the same as a bottle of the only stuff I have been able to find that doesn’t irritate my scalp.  I would happily use either.  I think I still prefer my old brand for scent though!

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This photo gives you an idea how the products are going after five weeks of use.

Ethique have several charities to which they direct a portion of their profits (WSPA, International Animal Rescue, The Orangutan Project and HUHA).  They also sponsor an orangutan and a slow loris).  Disappointingly, they do not appear to be helping any of New Zealand’s iconic native species that teeter on the brink.  I would love to see them sponsoring a few predator traps or adopting a yellow eyed penguin.  For a New Zealand company I feel this is a glaring omission.

A testament to the success of Ethique’s products is that they are often out of stock on their website.  It is well worth a look if you are interested in plastic free locally made beauty products.